San Francisco raises tobacco buying age to 21

San Francisco raises tobacco buying age to 21

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The Latest on an effort to raise the tobacco buying age to 21 in San Francisco (all times local):

3:20 p.m.

San Francisco officials unanimously approved an ordinance boosting the legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21.

The ordinance approved by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday applies to all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. The city joins New York City and Boston in setting the minimum age at 21.

Supervisor Scott Wiener, chief sponsor of the legislation, said raising the age limit will discourage young people from turning into lifelong smokers.

Opponents argue that California law set the age at 18 and that provision prohibits cities and counties from setting a higher limit.

A 2015 report by the Institute of Medicine found that 90 percent of daily smokers first tried a cigarette before age 19.

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1:50 a.m.

Supervisors in San Francisco are voting Tuesday on whether to increase the minimum age to buy tobacco from 18 to 21, even as opponents argue that cities and counties cannot trump California state law.

The ordinance would apply to all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes.

The issue has gained traction nationally as lawmakers try to discourage young people from starting to smoke. A 2015 report by the Institute of Medicine found that 90 percent of daily smokers first tried a cigarette before the age of 19.

Opponents argue that California state law already has a minimum age of 18, and that provision prohibits cities and counties from setting a higher limit.

The minimum age to buy tobacco is 21 in New York City, Boston and Hawaii.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press.

About The Author

Eduardo Santiago joined the FOX 9 and ABC 5 news team in February, 2012. That’s the same year KECY launched its very first local newscast. He has been covering local news in Yuma and the Imperial Valley since his start as a KYMA photojournalist in 2006. During his decade in broadcasting, Eduardo has covered some of the biggest stories in the Desert Southwest – from President Bush’s visit to Yuma, Ariz. to the uncovering of drug tunnels that span the US-Mexico border. One of the most memorable stories Eduardo covered was the 2010 Easter Earthquake that rocked the Imperial Valley, Mexicali, and Yuma. Eduardo, along with his news team, won an award from the Associated Press for best coverage of an ongoing story following the quake. Before he made his move to TV, Eduardo was just a kid born in East Los Angeles, where he spent his early childhood. His parents moved him to Mexicali, B.C. Mexico, where he did most of his elementary school education. He finally landed in El Centro, where he graduated from Central Union High School in 2005. Eduardo is currently a student at Imperial Valley College. You can find Eduardo hanging out in the Imperial Valley and Yuma with his family on any given weekend. His off-screen passion is playing guitar and sports.

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